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Quick Linux Question - Anyone Know How Big

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Tarot Redhand
Quick Linux Question - Anyone Know How Big

Anyone know which version of KiloByte is used for Linux? Apple, HD makers and Flash Memory use the KB = 1000 Bytes, while Microsoft and RAM makers use KB = 1024 Bytes. I just don't know which version is used by Linux. I suspect it is the 1024 Bytes one but don't know for sure.

TR

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meaglyn

Storage makers generally use base 10. It make their disks look bigger.  I suspect Apple uses 1024 for memory too. I've never seen anyone sell RAM based on base 10 kilobytes.   When you ask what Linux uses it really doesn't make sense because the confusion is generally not caused by the OS but by the difference between what disk manufacturers use and what every thing else thinks of as a KB,MB,GB... 

You also see this sometimes in network bandwidth. But since it's usually hard to see the difference it does not cause as much confusion.  Not like when you buy you 80GB disk and plug it into your OS and find it's really only 76GB.

I don't use apple products but I'd be really surprised if they actually used 1000bytes for a kb when say reporting file sizes.  That would be a waste of time.

Technically there are different terms for these units.  Kilobyte really does mean 1000, where as Kibibyte is 1024.   Like Kilogram etc.   10 KiB  vs 10KB  == 10240 vs 10000.   Same for MiB and GiB  etc.  But these have not garnered as much use outside of the tech geek world.   

 

Cheers,

meaglyn 

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Tarot Redhand

Quoting the Wikipedia page for kilobyte -

On modern systems, all versions of Microsoft Windows including the newest (as of 2015) Windows 10 divide by 1024 and represent a 65,536-byte file as 64KB.Conversely, Mac OS X Snow Leopard and newer represent this as 66KB, rounding to the nearest 1000 bytes. File sizes are reported with decimal prefixes.

In short it makes things look bigger on a mac than it is. You'll notice that Linux isn't mentioned on there which is why I asked.

Personally I'm going to stick with 2 to the power 10 and not use some silly name for it that the IEC came up with that sounds like a cheap brand of kitty litter.

TR

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meaglyn

Okay, so you mean file sizes, then yes, Linux does it as power of 2 as well.  Although that would be a display thing so it would be up to whatever UI you are using. For example Ubuntu's file manager could use base 10 and a different filemanager could use base 2.   I'm surprised that Apple went to the trouble of doing that.   The command line utilties  (e.g. ls)  use base 2.. What's reporting the file size could make a difference.

I suspect if you get under the covers on OSX and use the shell it'll report base 2.  It's a unix system underneath all the eye-candy.

So I suppose a Kilogram is 1024 grams then?  That's the point of using a different prefix.

 

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Zwerkules

And here I thought you would like kitty litter, maybe even the cheap brands.

 

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